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The 'Iron Man' armor suit gives soldiers super-human strength

The U.S. Special Operations Command (Ussocom) called on scientists to develop a lightweight smart suit using kevlar and nanotechnology that functions as a 'practical exoskeleton' to protect soldiers from shrapnel and bullets. The suit can monitor a soldier's heart rate, hydration levels and core temperature and respond to the data, supplied by an on-board computer hooked up to sensors, to keep a soldier in the best conditions for battle by providing heat, air conditioning and oxygen. If a soldier is wounded, the suit monitors their health and even stops bleeding using a "wound stasis" program such as one being developed by DARPA that sprays foam onto open injuries.

Image Credit - US Army

Image Credit - US Army

The Department of Defense plans to unveil its Iron Man-style TALOS suit in 2018.  The U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to engineer a next-generation, super-soldier style suit for military operators. The Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit (TALOS) -- named after the mythological Greek automaton made of bronze that Zeus assigned to protect his lover Europa -- will give the wearer super-human strength and protect soldiers from intensive combat situations. 

According to Defense One, the team’s early blueprint aimed to outfit the suit with full-body ballistic protection, integrated heating and cooling systems, 3D audio, embedded sensors and computers, and life-saving oxygen and hemorrhage controls — among other advanced tech. Defense industry officials believe hundreds of millions more dollars will inevitably be spent perfecting the technology before its put to use on a battlefield.

After manufacturing the suit behind closed doors for nearly a year, President Barack Obama proclaimed the U.S. military was “building Iron Man.”

 

Can the Circular Economy work for your business?

Can the Circular Economy work for your business?

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